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The Orkney Wargames Club meets

in Kirkwall on Thursday evenings.

 

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The Napoleonic Wars

The Napoleonic Wars – Playing the Period

Let’s give Boney a damned good thrashing! Napoleonic Wars in the Journal It began with a false start. Wargaming pals badgered me into trying the period, and in the end I opted for the British in the Peninsula. I painted up the 3rd Foot (“The Buffs”), but then the project ran out of steam. I

The Cavalry Battle of Gülden-Gossa 1813

The Napoleonic Wars, Shadow of the Eagles, 28mm This game was dictated by the fact that I picked up more boxes of cavalry than anything else. So, unsurprisingly we decided to stage a largely cavalry clash,  which would take place near the village of Gülden-Gossa, to the south of Leipzig. On 16 October, during the

The Battle of Raisagrod, 1812

The Napoleonic Wars, Shadow of the Eagles, 28mm The idea of this little game came from a “tabletop teaser” published in an old copy of Battlegames magazine. Unusually the author wasn’t Charles S. grant, but his son Charlie. In this one, the 6×4 foot table was dominated by two small Russian hamlets and a farm.

Crossing the Bobber, 1813

The Napoleonic Wars, The Shadow of the Eagles, 28mm These rules were a big hit the last time we played them. So, we decided to give them another spin. One of the things we all like is that they’re simple and fast play enough to let us easily finish a game in a club night.

The Battle of Antolpol, 1812

The Napoleonic Wars, Shadow of the Eagles, 28mm This week we decided to try out a new set of Napoleonic Rules. These were produced by Partizan Press, and were written by Keith Flint. I’d heard some good things about them – they were meant to be fast and fun – just what I like in

The Battle of Chashniki, 1812

The Napoleonic Wars, Field of Battle, 28mm This week’s game was a continuation of our dabbling in Piquet – Field of Battle. So, it was very much a learning curve game, with Mally and I commanding the French on one side, while Sean and newcomer Graham played the Russians. It was loosely based on the

The Klein-Künitz race, 1813

The Napoleonic Wars, Black Powder, 28mm We settled on a Napoleonic game this week, but it had to be a fairly small one, as we’re still playing on a 6×4 foot table in my kitchen parlour. The scenario was adapted from one in the late Stuart Asquith’s Scenarios for All Ages, but as his was

Crossing the Berezina, 1812

The Napoleonic Wars, Black Powder, 28mm I got the chance to stage a game at very short notice, thanks to a small window in the lockdown restrictions. My friend Gyles fancied a Napoleonic game, and wanted to field his new Saxons. Lindsay wanted to play, but had to do so virtually thanks to Covid restrictions.

Probing the Lines, Saint-Quentin, 1814

The Napoleonic Wars, General d’Armee, 28mm Well, this was a red letter day. It was my first game since lockdown began. Huzzah! Actually, it wasn’t a full-one game – just a small “learning curve” one, played out on the dining table. Still, to get my toys out, and to shuffle lead with real people (well,

Crossing the Bug, 1812

The Napoleonic Wars, Black Powder, 28mm This game took place half a lifetime ago. Actually, it was only two and a half weeks, but since then the world has turned upside down. It’s also our last game at the wargame club, at least for the foreseeable future. I’ve got one more game to post after

The Ambush at Suetovo, 1812

The Napoleonic Wars, Black Powder, 28mm This week we went for an all-cavalry game. The scenario was lifted from Charles S Grant and Stuart Asquith’s Scenarios for all Ages (1996), which has long been a source of fun gaming ideas. This one was called “Tables Turned”. In it, a powerful cavalry force chasing a weaker

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