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News – Covid

Gaming opportunities are still limited. The club isn’t open, but we can now play face-to-face games at home every fortnight.    At least it’s something though!

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The Second World War

Bretteville, Normandy, 1944

Second World War , Chain of Command, 28mm After our Great War game two weeks ago using the prototype of Great CoC, we decided to opt of an everyday game, using the rules as they were written, rather than with Great War amendments. Essentially the aim was familiarisation – both Campbell Hardie and Bill Gilchrist

Lebisey, Normandy, 1944

The Second World War, Chain of Command, 28mm We’re back in familiar territory again this week – the fields of Normandy. In this attack-defence scenario set during Operation Charnwood, the British were attacking towards Lebisey, to the north of Caen, while a scratch force of German Luftwaffe troops were holding them off. In this game

Rauray, Normandy, 1944

The Second World War, Chain of Command, 28mm Two Second World War games in one month might sound a bit excessive, but we were keen to try a bit of “Big CoC”. That’s the double entendre name the Two Fat Lardies give their bolt-on system which lets you turn Chain of Command from a platoon-sized

Cristot, Normandy, 1944

The Second World War, Chain of Command, 28mm Having driven up through the snow in the Highlands, I arrived back in Orkney to join in this game, set somewhere in Normandy. There wasn’t much subtlety to it. In fact, the table was the same one as we’d used for our Seven Years War game a

The Odon Valley, Normandy, 1944

The Second World War, Chain of Command, 28mm This game was a scenario lifted straight from the rules. The British had to get a unit off the far table edge – all the Germans had to do was to stop them. We played it on a 12 x 6 foot table, which in theory gave

El Fuq, Syria, 1941

The Second World War, Bolt Action, 28mm This week, I signed up for a game with Colin Jack, down in the Edinburgh club. His games are often a little “niche”, and this was no exception. It was a Bolt Action skirmish game, set in Syria in June 1941. The small fictional Syrian town of El

El Adem, Western Desert, 1941

The Second World War, Battlegroup Panzergrenadier, 10mm Just for a change we got the “peedie tanks” out. “Peedie” is the Orkney word for “small”, and what better way to describe 10-12mm tanks than that. The game was played out on a 10×6 foot table, using Battlegroup Panzergrenadier. I know a new Panzergrenadier Deluxe set has

Advance on Catania, 1943

The Second World War, Chain of Command, 28mm By popular demand we staged a Chain of Command game this week, and for a change we set it in Sicily. This was largely because Alan Bruce wanted to use his Italians – two  squads of Bersaglieri backed up by some armour and heavy weapons. We supported

Hubertise Farm, 1944

The Second World War, Chain of Command, 28mm The burgeoning little group of wargamers in Orkney was reduced to two this week, thanks to courses, interviews and work commitments. So, I ran a small Chain of Command game, to show newcomer Gyles what the rules were all about. The game was a straightforward platoon encounter,

La Ferme de la Vie en Rose, 1944

The Second World War, Chain of Command, 28mm This little game was a scenario lifted straight from an article by Richard Clark, who wrote the rules. In his turn he based it on a wartime British infantry platoon leader’s training manual, which gave it as an example of how a platoon should carry out an

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